Tornado destruction throughout Miami Valley, Wright State and community come together to help

Damage from one of the tornadoes that struck Beavercreek / Photo; Sarah Cavender / Wright State Guardian
Tornado destruction throughout Miami Valley, Wright State and community come together to help / Damage from one of the tornadoes that struck Beavercreek / Photo; Sarah Cavender / Wright State Guardian

Memorial Day weekend has been marked as a historical weather weekend for parts of the Miami Valley and Ohio. The National Weather Service confirmed 15 tornadoes that struck parts of Greene, Montgomery, Auglaize and Darke Counties.

Hundreds have been left without homes and businesses are picking up the pieces after roofs were torn off and debris causing massive damage.

Wright State University and the rest of the community have begun the clean up and began uniting together to assist families and those in need. A boil advisory throughout the region has left a need for water and supplies.

Haitham Shtaieh, from Hospitality Services at Wright State went out to several impacted areas with water and supplied free meals to residents. Chartwells hosted an event to feed residents affected in the Spicer Heights neighborhood.

“It was such a great event for Chartwells and Wright State,”Shtaieh said. “The appreciation that we received from the residents was overwhelming! It was extra special for me because my kids joined me and it’s the Holy month of Ramadan and we were all fasting.”

Photos provided by Haitham Tillawi / Spice Heights Cook Out / June 1
Photos provided by Haitham Shtaieh / Spice Heights Cook Out / June 1

Chartwells fed over 250 people according to Shtaieh and gave away two set of 50 case water over the course of two days.

Photos provided by Haitham Tillawi / Spice Heights Cook Out / June 1
Photos provided by Haitham Shtaieh / Spice Heights Cook Out / June 1

Wright State University President Cheryl Schrader sent out a campus wide email on May 29 to inform the community of a relief fund that was established.

Damage from one of the tornadoes that struck Beavercreek / Photo; Sarah Cavender / Wright State Guardian
Damage from one of the tornadoes that struck Beavercreek / Photo; Sarah Cavender / Wright State Guardian

“We were fortunate that our Dayton and Lake campuses were spared major damage, but I know that many in Raider Country were impacted; some even lost their homes. In challenging times, we come together and support one another. I know that many in our Wright State family want to help,” Schrader said. “I have already witnessed our Wright State community coming together and taking action. We opened up a residence hall to our students, faculty, and staff who needed emergency accommodations.”

Wright State Alumni Association’s established the Wright State Disaster Relief Fund on May 29 to assist those in need.

According to the website, “by reducing these financial burdens, we seek to provide peace and relief to our Wright State family during this difficult time. Seeing the destruction in Dayton and the surrounding Raider and Laker Country is devastating, but with your help we can rebuild.”

It has since received over $17,000 in donations. More information can be found at Wright State Disaster Relief Fund

Damage from one of the tornadoes that struck Beavercreek / Photo; Sarah Cavender / Wright State Guardian
Damage from one of the tornadoes that struck Beavercreek / Photo; Sarah Cavender / Wright State Guardian

Members of the Raider community helped those in Beavercreek and Trotwood in cleaning up debris and removing trees. Students from Student Government Association, H2O Church WSU, 4 Paws for Ability, Lambda Chi Alpha, Wright State Housing, Women’s Soccer, Men’s Baseball, and many others gathered together to meet at different locations.

The Wright State Women’s Center has opened up their personal care pantry to all students, staff, and faculty in need. Those on campus can stop by for items such as deodorant, shampoo, soap, and feminine hygiene products.

Wright State housing is also offering a place for displaced families at no cost through June 12. According to Dan Berstos, Director for Residence Life and Housing, there are about 30 individuals who are currently living in Hamilton, with about half being faculty with families, and the rest are students.

Emergency housing is still available for WSU students, faculty & staff in Hamilton Hall. They will be providing sheets, blankets, pillows & towels.

Those in need should call Residence Life & Housing at 937-775-4172.

“Hospitality Services offered them lunch yesterday, and may be doing more in the future, but noting is certain at this time. They also partnered with Pepsi to provide bottled water to crews in the area clearing debris & restoring services,” said Berstos.

 

Damage from one of the tornadoes that struck Beavercreek / Photo; Sarah Cavender / Wright State Guardian
Damage from one of the tornadoes that struck Beavercreek / Photo; Sarah Cavender / Wright State Guardian